Viewing posts with tag mebe.

FBU: My First Build Tool™

EDIT 2017-04-04: I have since renamed the project to MBU: Mix Build Utilities and published it on Hex.pm: hex.pm/packages/mbu. I have edited the links and code examples in this post to reflect that.


tl;dr I wrote my own build tool using Elixir’s Mix: Nicd/mbu.

It’s no secret that I somewhat dislike the state of modern web development. JavaScript is its own terrible world, but one of the sad parts of it is the ecosystem and tooling around it. There’s a lot of innovation and hard work going on in very many fragmented projects, resulting in reimplementations of already solved problems and a ton of half working, alpha quality, 0.x versioned packages with unknown support status. With these packages, you start your project by building an elaborate house of cards that is the build system. And you dread the day when you need to touch it again.

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Mebe Forked

Just noticed someone has forked Mebe into their own version. Haven’t looked at it more thoroughly, but looking at the feature list they have added lots of useful stuff and removed stuff that Mebe still has that is specific to my own blog (I’m working on removing them piece by piece). If interested, you should totally check it out on Github: https://github.com/nmqanh/geekpress.

This is the first project I have that has been forked by someone, makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. 😊 Though also a bit embarrassed of all the things they have had to fix in the engine… Anyway, such a great motivator to see someone use something you have created.

More Mebe Benchmarks

You may remember that earlier this fall I found out just how much faster a 2048-bit HTTPS certificate is for the server to handle. Now that I got one from Let’s Encrypt, I decided to redo the performance tests with the new certificate all set up. Since I ran out of credits on my blitz.io free account, I did the new tests with loader.io’s free tier instead. That’s why the graphs are a bit different this time.

Before I go into the HTTPS results, I will bring some context. You might remember that last time I got about 730 requests per second served over HTTPS with a 2048-bit key, and about 1380 requests per second for plain HTTP. Quoting myself from that time: “So fast… 🚀”. Turns out I spoke too soon. By disabling some extraneous console logging, I was able to more than double the performance. Let’s see the latest results.

For reference: The server is an online.net Dedibox XC with an 8-core Intel Atom C2750 processor and 8 GB of DDR3 RAM.

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New Server!

So I went and ordered myself a new server. My old one was a VPS from Linode with 1 core, 1 GB of RAM and a 24 GB disk. The new one is a dedicated server from online.net with 8 cores, 8 GB of RAM and 1 TB of hard disk space. At the same time it is only slightly more expensive so I jumped at the opportunity. How reliable it actually is will only be shown with time, but I like living on the bleeding edge. So I thought I would write a blog post about all the stuff I run into when setting up the new server. Note: This post is meant for reference only, not as a guide. Be sure look for recommendations from people wiser than myself regarding any security settings.

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Mebe Updated with RSS Feeds

Last night, when I was supposed to go to bed early, I instead decided “I’ll just quickly code that one thing”. Way too many hours later it was ready: Mebe now has RSS feed support. There are two types of feeds, one for all posts in general and another for tag feeds.

This means you can now follow this blog with your RSS reader too. Just subscribe to /feed. Or, if you want to follow a certain tag, subscribe to /tag/tagname/feed.

PS.: RFC 822 dates are stupid. Just look at this abomination I came up with.

Mebe and the Remote Shell

What better way to spend a slow weekend than by writing another blog engine? Plenty, actually, but that’s what I did anyway. The result of this work: Mebe! This blog is now powered by a wonderful mix of Elixir and Phoenix. It has all the features that Laine had, with the addition of an actually working Disqus comment system. It’s also search engine indexable, which I thought I didn’t care about, until I didn’t have it anymore. Not that I’m aiming for tons of visitors, but writing about some tech problem I have fixed is kind of pointless if no one can find the post by googling for it.

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